Arvest Bank Offers Special Assistance to Customers Affected by Shutdown

Friday, January 25 at 08:00 AM
Category: Arvest News

Arvest Bank has announced additional accommodations for our customers affected by the current government shutdown. Because we understand the uncertainty caused by an interruption in income, we’ve established a Special Assistance Customer Care hotline for our customers who need help managing their accounts during this time.

If you have concerns about your accounts related to the government shutdown, please call this dedicated line during normal business hours – 

Arvest Special Assistance Customer Care: (877) 483-2940.

A customer care associate will walk you through specific accommodations available to you.

  • ARVEST MORTGAGE CUSTOMERS: Arvest is suppressing credit reporting, waiving late fees and offering payment assistance including forbearance. In addition to calling (877) 483-2940, mortgage customers can visit the Arvest website to learn more about hardship assistance. Options will vary based on loan type and investor guidelines.
  • PERSONAL LOANS (AUTO, HOME EQUITY, DEBT CONSOLIDATION, ETC.): Arvest is offering payment deferrals for existing loans based on need. In addition, Arvest is waiving origination fees and offering an extension of the first payment due date for some new consumer loan types. Affected customers are encouraged to call (877) 483-2940 to discuss options.
  • CONSUMER AND BUSINESS CREDIT CARD CUSTOMERS: Arvest is offering payment deferrals. Affected customers are encouraged to call (877) 483-2940.
  • CHECKING ACCOUNT HOLDERS: Arvest is waiving account insufficient funds and overdraft fees, as well as monthly account fees, when applicable. To request these waivers or refunds, please call (877) 483-2940.
  • BUSINESS OR COMMERCIAL LOANS: Please contact your local Arvest banker for personalized assistance.

At Arvest we are committed to helping our customers through this challenging time. If you have questions about any of the above accommodations or your eligibility, please do not hesitate to call (877) 483-2940.

Tags: Arkansas, Budgeting, Business Banking, Community Support, Credit Cards, Credit History, Credit Score, Customer Question, Debt, Home Loans, Kansas, Lending and Financing, Missouri, Mortgage, Oklahoma, Overdraft Coverage
 

Arvest Bank Offers Assistance to Customers Affected by Shutdown

Wednesday, January 09 at 04:00 PM
Category: Arvest News

Arvest Bank wants to advise any loan customers dealing with a reduction in income due to the current government shutdown that help is available for those who need assistance. Customers who have concerns about their loan obligations are encouraged to contact the bank during normal business hours to discuss their options.

  • Any affected Arvest Mortgage customers can call (800) 232-5524 or visit the Arvest website to learn more about hardship assistance due to the shutdown, natural disasters or other loss of income.
  • Arvest customers with concerns about other Arvest personal loan types (auto, home equity, debt consolidation, etc.) are encouraged to call (855) 303-5479. 
  • Arvest consumer and business credit card customers should call (800) 356-8085.
  • Business customers with business and/or commercial loans should contact their local Arvest banker.

Arvest Bank understands the uncertainty created by an interruption of income by situations like this, and is committed to helping those customers who need assistance through this difficult time.

 

Tags: Arkansas, Credit Cards, Debt, Kansas, Lending and Financing, Missouri, Oklahoma
 

Trim Your Monthly Expenses

Monday, June 19 at 10:20 AM
Category: Personal Finance
It comes as no surprise summer is a great time to get in shape. But, do you realize there's an easy way to get in great shape without having to put on workout clothes or sneakers or even breaking a sweat? It's called getting into financial shape. And you can accomplish that fairly easily by doing one simple activity — trimming your monthly expenses.
 
Here are some suggestions for losing that extra financial baggage this summer:
  • Get rid of higher-interest debt. If you have credit card debt, you may be wasting a significant part of your monthly budget on interest fees. Try to pay off any debt you can or at the very least, to consolidate higher-interest debt to lower-interest credit cards. To avoid credit card debt in the future, pay for purchases in cash.
  • Lower your cellphone bill. Most of us can't live without our cellphones. We can, however, do without those expensive monthly bills, which can be budget busters. Take some time to review your bill to determine your usage and to see if you can move to a less expensive plan. Or if that's not possible, shop around with other carriers.
  • Share the ride. Gasoline and car maintenance can take a big portion out of your budget. One way to reduce your automobile expense is to carpool with others. Or, if you live close to work, consider walking or riding your bike.
  • Dine in. There is a lot to love about dining out. You don't have to worry about what to cook or spend your valuable time cleaning up. But, dining out frequently can be very expensive. By preparing and eating your meals at home, you may be able to save hundreds of dollars each month. Also, if you work outside your home, pack a lunch and be sure to brew your own coffee.
  • Save energy at home. Put some energy into reducing your utility costs by using energy-efficient light bulbs, turning off lights, and conserving water.
  • Reduce your cable bill. Spending too much on cable? Examine your bill and see if you can get rid of premium channels. Or consider, eliminating cable altogether and using subscription services.
  • Get rid of your gym/club memberships. If you belong to a gym and don't get there often, cancel your membership. It's only worth it if you use it.
The best method for determining ways to save is to record and review your monthly expenses. Then, once you cut your expenses, take that extra money and put it in a savings account. In no time at all, you'll see that you look a whole lot better with trimmer expenses. 

Tags: Credit Cards, Debt, Financial Education, Savings
 

6 Financial Traps New College Graduates Should Avoid

Monday, June 12 at 08:45 AM
Category: Personal Finance
As college students graduate and start their careers, financial responsibility should be a top priority. However, it’s easy to fall into traps that could hinder new college graduates from securing their financial future.
 
New college graduates should avoid the following financial traps:
  • Not having a budget. Simply put, don’t spend more than you make. Calculate the amount of money you’re taking home after taxes, then figure out how much money you can afford to spend each month while contributing to your savings. Be sure to factor in recurring expenses such as student loans, monthly rent, utilities, groceries, transportation expenses and car loans. 
  • Forgoing an emergency fund. Make it a priority to set aside the equivalent of three to six months’ worth of living expenses. Start putting some money away immediately, no matter how small the amount. A bank savings account is a smart place to stash your cash for a rainy day.
  • Paying bills late – or not at all. Each missed payment can hurt your credit history for up to seven years, and can affect your ability to get loans, the interest rates you pay on loans and your ability to get a job or rent an apartment. Consider setting up automatic payments for regular expenses like student loans, car payments and phone bills.
  • Racking up debt. Understand the responsibilities and benefits of credit. Shop around for a card that best suits your needs, and spend only what you can afford to pay back. It’s a great tool if you use it responsibly. 
  • Not thinking about the future. It may seem odd since you’re just beginning your career, but now is the best time to start planning for your retirement. Contribute to your employer’s 401(k) or similar account, especially if there is a company match. Invest enough to qualify for your company’s full match – it’s free money.  
  • Ignoring help from your bank. Most banks offer online, mobile and text banking tools to manage your account night and day. Use these tools to check balances, pay bills, deposit checks, monitor transaction history and track budgets.  
College graduates can find many enticing ways to spend their paychecks from their first “real” job. However, by avoiding these financial traps, the new graduate can make financial responsibility a top priority instead of exceeding their new income.
 
Information courtesy of American Bankers Association. 
 
Tags: Budgeting, Debt, Financial Education, Savings
 

6 Steps to Dig Out of Holiday Debt

Tuesday, January 03 at 09:45 AM
Category: Personal Finance

It's a holiday leftover many of us carry around for months. It's not Aunt Edna's fruitcake or even those few extra pounds amassed from all the holiday treats. It's the excess debt that comes from spending more than you can afford during the holiday season. Unfortunately, for many Americans, a few festive days of the year can result in mounds of depressing debt that can take months to shed.

If you find yourself with leftover holiday debt, here are some steps you can take:
  1. Stop the credit storm. If you can't purchase something with cash or your debit card, don't buy it. While it's important to have credit cards for emergencies, it's a good idea to put them on ice until you pay down your debt.
  2. Start digging out. On your credit card statement is the minimum payment amount you must make each month to cover finance charges. Always pay more than that amount. The more you pay, the faster you will pay down your balance. If you have multiple credit card accounts, focus on paying off the ones with the highest interest rates first.
  3. Consolidate higher-interest debt. Many credit card companies offer attractive balance transfer offers that come with low teaser rates and sometimes there are no fees to activate this benefit, allowing you to transfer higher-interest balances to save on interest. Be sure to read the fine print so you know when the introductory rate expires and what the prevailing rate will be. It's also critical to close the accounts from which you transferred the debt. Many people make the mistake of keeping those cards and running up new balances, creating even more debt.
  4. Take advantage of rewards. Competitive credit cards offer rewards points for each dollar you spend. You can often use your points as statement credits to help you pay toward your card balance.
  5. Minimize your other spending. Take a close look at your monthly budget and see if you can cut your spending in other areas in order to pay more on your credit card debt. If you have the opportunity to make more money, either by picking up more hours at work or getting a second job, consider putting excess funds on your credit card debt.
  6. Stay the course. While it can be overwhelming to look at the debt you owe, the most important thing you can do is keep making payments. If you keep digging, you're sure to see a clear path toward credit card debt freedom.
With some conscious effort, you can relieve yourself of holiday debt, so you’re not paying for your festivities for the rest of the New Year. 

Tags: Debt, Financial Education

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